Deuteronomy 1: Do Not Fear

My Introductory Comments:

Deuteronomy, the fifth book of the Jewish Torah (Pentateuch), was quoted by Christ more than any other Old Testament book and is referred to over 80 times in the New Testament. Emphasized throughout the text is the spiritual principle of the Law of Moses and the development (and application) of the Law in Israel’s new home – the Promised Land.

Knowing he was not joining Israel as they entered Canaan, Moses makes a personal plea to the people. He recounts Israel’s history after the exodus from Egyptian slavery. He reviews the law given by God in the previous three books. And he sets before the Israelites the choice between obedience and disobedience.

If you study carefully, you can pick up on Moses’ personal tone, emotion and reflection. Study the book as an example of a treaty between a king (God) and his people (the Israelites). Of course, “treaty” is another word for “covenant”.

To continue reading Zak’s post, click the “Read More” link above “My Introductory Comments”.

A Chapter Per Day


Welcome to Deuteronomy. In chapter 1, we are met right away with a speech from Moses that provides an overview of the wandering in the desert that we read about in Exodus.

Deu 1:20  And I said unto you, Ye are come unto the mountain of the Amorites, which the LORD our God doth give unto us.

Deu 1:21  Behold, the LORD thy God hath set the land before thee: go up and possess it, as the LORD God of thy fathers hath said unto thee; fear not, neither be discouraged.

This was the first time that the Israelites got near the Promised Land, but you know the story. God told them that the land would belong to them, they sent spies in, the spies brought back a fearful report and the people decided that they didn’t want to go in because they were afraid.

How many times does this…

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One comment on “Deuteronomy 1: Do Not Fear

  1. Pingback: Deuteronomy 4: The LORD, He is God | Delight Thyself in the LORD

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